Visual Arts

GALLERY ONE11

NOW SHOWING

Paul Caponigro: The Influence + Impact Artist Talk, February 18, 2021

Paul Caponigro: The Influence + Impact Virtual Tour

About The Exhibit:

Paul Caponigro is renowned as one of America’s most significant photographers. At the age of thirteen, he began to explore the world around him with his camera and has subsequently sustained a career spanning six decades. Acclaimed for his spiritually moving images of Stonehenge and other Celtic megaliths of England and Ireland, Mr. Caponigro has also photographed the temples, shrines and sacred gardens of Japan. His work inspires viewers with glimpses of the mystical woodland of his native New England. Approaching nature receptively, he prefers to utilize an intuitive focus rather than merely arranging or recording forms and surface details. His unparalleled ability to engage the viewer in the mystical presence concealed in nature continues to leave a lasting contribution to photography. Mr. Caponigro has exhibited and taught throughout the United States and abroad. As a recipient of two Guggenheim fellowships and three National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) grants, in 2001 he received the Centenary Medal from the Royal Photographic Society in recognition of his significant contribution to the art of photography. Mr. Caponigro’s images are included in most history of photography texts and numerous museum collections, including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and the Museum of Modern Art, New York. 

Exhibiting with Mr. Caponigro will be two regional photographers whose work has been heavily influenced by Mr. Caponigro, Mr. Pradip Malde and Dr. David Dennard. 

Professor Malde is a photographer and professor at the University of the South, Sewanee, TN, where he is the co-director of the Haiti Institute. He is a 2018 Guggenheim Fellow, for which he recently has completed work about female genital cutting. His works are held in the collections of Museum of the Art Institute, Chicago; Princeton University Museum; Victoria & Albert Museum, London, Yale University Museum and the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, Edinburgh, among others.  

In 1993, Professor Malde, who has been heavily influenced by Mr. Caponigro throughout his photographic career, invited Dr. Dennard to spend a weekend with him during which he introduced Dr. Dennard to Mr. Caponigro’s work.  It was an enlightening moment that has affected Dr. Dennard’s photographic pursuits to this day and ultimately recently resulted in his studying periodically in Mr. Caponigro’s darkroom over the course of a year.  Dr. Dennard has had work exhibited in many galleries around the country over the past few years. 

This exhibition is a tribute to all teachers and the immeasurable impact they can have on their students. 

On February 18th, we will be having a free virtual artist talk with Dave Dennard and Pradip Malde. To join, please RSVP by emailing Savannah Thomas, Creative Arts Guild Gallery Director, savannaht@creativeartsguild.org or by calling 706-279-3129.

ABOUT THE ARTISTS

Paul Caponigro

Born in Boston in 1932, Paul Caponigro is renowned as one of America’s most significant master photographers. When he was thirteen, he began to explore the world around him with his camera and subsequently sustained a career spanning nearly seventy years. He is currently regarded as one of America’s foremost landscape photographers.

Acclaimed for his spiritually moving images of Stonehenge and other Celtic megaliths of England and Ireland, Caponigro has also photographed the temples, shrines and sacred gardens of Japan and inspires viewers with glimpses of deep, mystical woodland of his New England haunts.

Caponigro approaches nature receptively, preferring to utilize an intuitive focus rather that merely arranging or recording forms and surface details.

Music has always been an essential aspect of his life. Although he shifted from the piano to photography early in his artistic career, he remains a dedicated pianist and believes his musical training and insight contributes significantly to his photographic imagery. In his photographs the visual ‘silence’ becomes as tangible as ‘sound’.

Paul Caponigro has exhibited and taught throughout the United States and abroad. He is the recipient of two Guggenheim Fellowships and three National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) grants, Caponigro’s images will be found in the photographic collections of most museums, texts on the history of photography and is one of the undisputed masters of photography.

David Dennard

My photography is a garden of carefully selected “flowers” from around the world.  Each one has been gently and lovingly nurtured.  Like a flower beside a forest trail, if someone stumbles upon one of them and finds some beauty or delight in doing so, then my heart shall be quite content.

David Dennard is a semi-retired kidney specialist in Dalton, Ga.  He is a long-time photographer focusing on black and white photography and has exhibited in galleries across the country. Over the last 5 years, he has been excited by his return to the darkroom to create both silver and platinum/palladium prints. Paul Caponigro has long been an inspiration to him as a photographer, after first being introduced to his work by Pradip Malde over 25 year ago and he considers his time studying with Paul Caponigro at his darkroom in Maine truly the highlight of his photographic journey. 

Pradip Malde

Pradip Malde is a photographer and professor at the University of the South, Sewanee, TN, where he is the co-director of the Haiti Institute. Much of his work considers the experience of loss and how it serves as a catalyst for regeneration. He is currently working in rural communities in Haiti, Tanzania and Tennessee, designing models for community development through photography.

Works are held in the collections of Museum of the Art Institute, Chicago; Princeton University Museum; Victoria & Albert Museum, London, Yale University Museum and the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, Edinburgh, among others. He is a 2018 Guggenheim Fellow, for which Malde compiled work and is preparing a book of photographs about female genital cutting, that “looks askance at the explicit but, with widened eyes, directly at loss and sacrifice”.

Malde was born in Arusha, Tanzania in 1957. His parents were the children of Indians who emigrated to East Africa but had to flee from the turmoil that spread through that region in the 1970s. Concerned about loss and belonging since then, he has come to think of artifacts as membranes, where what may be explicit and immutable begins to lead us into the realms of memory and meaning, and ultimately, understanding the experiences of others.